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 Silent Killer

The pandemic disease I'm referring to is the deadliest disease on the planet, responsible for taking about 18 million lives around the world each and every year. In 2019 alone, it was responsible for the death of about 647,000 Americans. That averages out to about 12,400 American deaths per week.

There's a pandemic disease out there that kills one American every 37 seconds. And it's spreading all over the world too, causing an enormous burden for people, communities, and healthcare providers and systems.

No— I'm not talking about COVID-19.

The pandemic disease I'm referring to is the deadliest disease on the planet, responsible for taking about 18 million lives around the world each and every year. In 2019 alone, it was responsible for the death of about 647,000 Americans. That averages out to about 12,400 American deaths per week.

Since the early 1980s it has been spreading around the globe and it has shown no signs of slowing down. And over the next decade it's estimated it will continue spreading exponentially.

The worse part about it is that even our most advanced medical technology does not do a very good job of detecting it, and as such is failing miserably in slowing it down or stopping it. 

If you haven't guessed it by now, the pandemic I'm referring to is heart disease, also known as the "silent killer". And it is something you should not overlook during the current COVID-19 hysteria.

Heart Disease: World's Deadliest Growing Pandemic

Heart disease refers to various types of conditions that affect the flow of blood to and from the heart muscle. Also known as coronary artery disease (CAD), coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic heart disease (IHD), or arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), it describes a condition in which the arteries of the heart become obstructed, thereby restricting the flow of blood. When blood is limited to the heart muscle, its cells do not receive sufficient amounts of oxygen.

The extent to which the amount of oxygen-rich blood is limited to the cells of the heart determines the degree of severity and consequences. Mild to moderate states of low oxygen in heart cells can commonly cause chest pain (angina pectoris) and shortness of breath. A more severe state results in what is commonly known as a heart attack or myocardial infarction, which involves the complete blockage of blood flow to the heart for a long enough time that part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies.

Heart disease is generally a slow moving disease that develops over a long period of time. Because of this it is common for people suffering from heart disease to not show any symptoms for decades prior to clinical diagnosis. Not surprisingly, diagnosis commonly happens only after a heart attack occurs, and often by then it is too late to be able to do anything about it. This is why it is known as the "silent killer".

Despite decades of research, the cause of heart disease is unknown and inconclusive. However there are various risk factors that are known to be highly predictive of its onset.

Several years ago, psychoemotional factors such as depression, sadness, loneliness, long term anxiety and stress, and feelings of despondency (loss of hope and courage), were identified as strong predictors of heart disease.

The Silent Killer Being Ignored During COVID-19 Peak Data Reporting 

It is quite possible that many of the deaths said to have been caused by COVID-19 may actually have been due to heart disease or any number of other chronic diseases that top the list of mortality in the US, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, influenza, pneumonia, and others.

Most people generally overlook the importance of the mind and emotions on the heart and its role in disease. And since we don't really have to consciously do anything for the heart to work and do its job, its function is generally ignored. But the heart plays a very important role in the outcome of many different diseases and poor health conditions.

Interestingly enough, most of the reported deaths related to COVID-19 actually involve cardiac related complications including arrhythmia (irregular heart beating), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), or cardiac arrest ( acute heart failure). And many of those said to have become seriously infected with and survived COVID-19 report feeling severe shortness of breath and chest pain. All of these are classic signs and symptoms of there being a lack of oxygen in the heart muscle.

Throughout the outbreak, US health officials at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have not been very specific about instructing hospitals to separate data of those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and then died, from those people who had preexisting conditions and were infected then died. In fact, the CDC has emphasized "that Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19 should be reported on the death certificate for all decedents where the disease caused or is assumed [empasis added] to have caused or contributed to death" (CDC, "Guidance for Certifying COVID-19 Deaths," 2020). This is a very important detail to understand as it can greatly distort and inflate the actual number of deaths being caused specifically by COVID-19.

It is highly probable that many of the deaths said to have been caused by COVID-19 may actually have been due to heart disease or any number of other chronic diseases that top the list of mortality in the US, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, influenza, pneumonia, and others.

Do not forget heart disease and many other chronic diseases have been the leading causes of death in the US for decades. Without accurate reporting on COVID-19 deaths, there is really no way of telling just how serious COVID-19 really is. Certainly the existing data does not justify that all facets of society around the world should be coming to a grinding halt.  

About the Author

authorRene M. Rodriguez is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine and board licensed acupuncturist with 20 years experience in alternative natural medicine. He's in private practice in Los Angeles, CA, speciliazing in digestive disorders, skin conditions, infections, environmental illness, and mind-body health and wellness. For more information, please click here.


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